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Developing DIVE, a design-led futures technique for SMEs

Mejia, J. R., Pasman, G., Hultink, E. J., & Stappers, P. J. (2017). Developing DIVE, a design-led futures technique for SMEs. In C. Vogel & G. Muratovski (Eds.), Proceedings of the IASDR Conference Re: Research (pp. 770–787). Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.

 

Design of vision concepts to explore the future: Nature, context and design techniques

Mejia Sarmiento, J. R., Simonse, W. L., & Hultink, E. J.

Industrial firms are facing a constant dilemma, being ready for the future, have a vision, and at the same time act within the current situation, exploit current products efficiently. This research examines visions that embody future opportunities and ideas, “vision concepts” such as concept cars and concept kitchens. We studied five cases of vision concepts to unravel the nature of design techniques behind these vision concepts. Our findings present a comparison of similarities and differences in nature, organizational context, and design techniques. The key contribution of the study centers on a new understanding of how vision concepts explore the future though the embodiment of ideas and how designers share and lead the concept visioning process in the organizational context. We propose an initial framework for the design of vision concepts with significant implications for industrial firms.

How will people have a personal and conscious shopping experience in a traditional way in 2031?

Category : #FutureThroughDesign / PhD project · No Comments · by Apr 4th, 2017

The design of a vision concept to explore the future of Solutions Group

  • Problem owner: Solutions Group
  • Process owners: design students from Joint Master Project at the Industrial Design Engineering, TU Delft: Julie Kuiperi, Bob Verheij, Iris ten Brink, and Mercedes Leipoldt; and design coach: Ricardo Mejia from the ID Studiolab, TUDelft.
  • Place & Date: The Netherlands and Colombia, 2016.

Vision concepts, a design-led futures technique, for SMEs

Category : #FutureThroughDesign / PhD project · (1) Comment · by Feb 22nd, 2017

Siga el link para ver un video explicativo en español – Another video (in Spanish) following this link.

Over the last few decades, design has gained a prominent strategic position. Organizations have started to look at design as a process, which adds value to the front end of innovation (Verganti, 2009). As a process, Deserti (2011) distinguishes between situational and visionary design. The latter, also known as design-led futures, is a form of design, interested in ideas and not just products (Dunne & Raby, 2011), which experiment on speculative futures (Auger, 2012) to stimulate radical innovation. Prototypical examples are concept cars, traditionally used to guide automakers through change.

Small and medium-sized enterprises have lagged behind in applying design (De Lille, 2014), especially in nontraditional forms, e.g. design-led futures, largely because there are no established methods to facilitate their implementation. We propose a tailor-made, design-led futures technique that assists designers through developing vision concepts for SMEs (Mejia Sarmiento, Pasman, Hultink, & Stappers, 2017), called DIVE. It builds on our inquiries on vision concepts in large corporations (Mejia Sarmiento, Hultink, Pasman, & Stappers, 2016).

Vision Concepts within the landscape of design research

Mejia Sarmiento, J. R., Pasman, G., & Stappers, P. J.

In the landscape of design research, several techniques of speculative design -or design about ideas- have been positioned, each with a different time frame. Design Fiction and Critical Design, for instance, emerged as making activities that explore the near and the speculative future, respectively. We previously defined Vision Concepts as a design-led technique that explores and communicates speculative futures. Even though Vision Concepts, such as long-term concept cars and products, have been part of the industry since 1938, previous work has failed to identify and understand them from the design research perspective or compared them with other speculative design techniques. This study intends to identify which spot Vision Concepts occupies within the landscape of design research. To that end, we developed a multiple case analysis that includes examples of Vision Concepts, Design Fiction, and Critical Design. This paper will help design researchers identify the similarities and differences between Vision Concepts and the other speculative design techniques and gain knowledge about when and why to apply this technique.

Keywords: vision concepts; concept cars; speculative design; design fiction; critical design